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Overall, men are somewhat more likely than women to experience at least one of the elements of online harassment, 44% vs. In terms of specific experiences, men are more likely than women to encounter name-calling, embarrassment, and physical threats.Beyond those demographic groups, those whose lives are especially entwined with the internet report experiencing higher rates of harassment online.This includes those who have more information available about them online, those who promote themselves online for their job, and those who work in the digital technology industry.Perpetrators of online harassment: A plurality of those who have experienced online harassment, 38%, said a stranger was responsible for their most recent incident and another 26% said they didn’t know the real identity of the person or people involved.About a third felt their reputation had been damaged by their overall experience with online harassment.Overall, 15% of those who have experienced online harassment said it impacted their reputation.Those who responded to their most recent incident with online harassment took the following steps: Regardless of whether a user chose to ignore or respond to the harassment, people were generally satisfied with their outcome.

Those who have ever experienced stalking, physical threats, or sustained or sexual harassment were more likely to take multiple steps in response to their latest incident than those who have experienced name-calling and embarrassment, 67% vs. They are more likely to take actions like unfriending or blocking the person responsible, confronting the person online, reporting the person to a website or online service, changing their username or deleting their profile, and ending their attendance at certain offline events and places.

Pew Research asked respondents about six different forms of online harassment.

Those who witnessed harassment said they had seen at least one of the following occur to others online: In Pew Research Center’s first survey devoted to the subject, two distinct but overlapping categories of online harassment occur to internet users.

Harassment—from garden-variety name calling to more threatening behavior— is a common part of online life that colors the experiences of many web users.

Fully 73% of adult internet users have seen someone be harassed in some way online and 40% have personally experienced it, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

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